Hand Pollinating Squash & Zucchini to Produce More Food!

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In this video you’ll see how I hand pollinate squash & zucchini. I’ll also show you how to tell the difference between the male and female flowers and where to stick it. The, um, pollen that…

25 COMMENTS

  1. There are typically many more male flowers to pollinate the female ones.
    After hand pollinating, I usually gently open the male flowers and remove
    the stamen, then dip the blossoms in tempura batter and fry them up. They
    are a delicious side dish and pretty to serve too. Also, even though
    people like to sometimes pick baby zucchini, I let them grow to full
    maturity. It feeds more people and there is nothing more delectable than a
    freshly picked, garden grown veggie to be shared by family and friends!
    The leaves can also be fried quickly and crumbled onto pasta or rice so I
    really like to use the whole plant. Less waste. But a warning, the leaves
    will be on the oily side so use sparingly~

  2. This is my first year with drip irrigation. I started out in the spring
    setting the auto timer to water 30 minutes in the morning, every other day.
    The heat is here with a vengeance now, so I’m going to set it up to water 1
    hour every other day now and see how that does. When it gets really August
    hot (in the low 100’s each day), I might set it up to water every day.
    We’ll see. Too much water can be just as bad as not enough though.

  3. Any idea why the female zucchini flowers would turn yellow and fall off
    before even mature enough to bloom? I’ve got all kinds of male flowers
    doing great, but the female ones are just turning yellow and falling off
    (not a pollination issue, as the flowers on it aren’t mature enough to
    bloom.)

  4. Using the male flower instead of a qtip has worked better for me. Plus it
    is on a longer stem so it is easier to reach the female flower. I used each
    method on a different plant and the qtip one didn’t produce as many fruit

  5. I’ve been doing this even tho I have seen bees.Its well worth the few
    minutes it takes to do this because no doubt it has doubled production.One
    thing you DON’T want to do is grow too close your zukes and yellow
    squash,otherwise you end up with stripped squash which is fine to
    eat.Change your Q-Tip between varieties also.Thanks for posting this R-71,I
    always like your vids.

  6. If you don’t have a female, you just have to wait for one. Hand pollenating
    is of no use without at least one of both ;).

  7. Great video. What do you do if you don’t have any female to do this. Unless
    I’m confused, you said the female is at the end of the squash. Well, I
    haven’t been able to get my 1st squash yet…so what do I do? I do think my
    veggies are lacking nitrogen because all the buds fall off. Hopefully this
    wknd I’ll be able to get my 13/13/13 or 16/16/16 fertilizer & I will
    purchase my mittleider magic on the 1st.

  8. I would use the back of an electric toothbrush for those, or just spank the
    stems of the tomatoes lightly with a news paper. The female part and the
    pollen are in the same flower and they just need vibration to shake it
    loose and pollenate there.

  9. I’ve been watching Wranlerstar building a hive and learning how to keep
    bees and it’s fascinating. One of these days if we can get us a little
    piece of property of our own and start a farm I think I might like doing
    that.

  10. HAHAHA. If you have kids and it’s time for “the talk”, it’s a good time for
    it while you’re doing that. LOL

  11. they are so good they go for a lot in the supermarket. but when you garden
    yourself it is so good cause you put the minerals and compost and all
    nutrients to make that flower so you know it is going to taste good. Fried
    or raw they are great to eat. just remember to collect them as soon as they
    fall cause the ants love them .

  12. ive seen recipes using the male flowers as a appetizers. You can stuff them
    with cream cheese and coat them with egg and flour and fry them. :) so
    nothing goes to waste.

  13. Mmmmm Zucchini. My plants are still small but they are slowly getting
    bigger. Of course this also works for cucumbers too.

  14. Could be heat swings, watering, the plant trying to conserve energy by
    throwing off flowers so it can’t pollinate. Lots of variables that could be
    in play. Without knowing more, it’s hard to say.

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